OFFICIAL: SECURITY COUNCIL REMOVES IRAQ FROM CHAPTER VII (Commentary & Research)
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  1. #1
    RED LILY
    Guest

    Exclamation OFFICIAL: SECURITY COUNCIL REMOVES IRAQ FROM CHAPTER VII (Commentary & Research)

    Security Council
    SC/11050



    27 June 2013









    Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York
    Security Council 6990th Meeting (AM)


    UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTING RESOLUTION 2107 (2013),
    SECURITY COUNCIL REMOVES IRAQ FROM CHAPTER VII OBLIGATIONS OVER RETURN OF KUWAITI NATIONALS









    Foreign Minister Hails Text as ‘Significant Step’ in Mending Bilateral Ties


    The Security Council today decided to remove Iraq from its obligations under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter concerning the return of Kuwaiti and third-State nationals or their remains and their property seized by Iraq’s former regime during its 1990 invasion of Kuwait.


    Unanimously adopting resolution 2107 (2013), the 15-member body welcomed the Secretary-General’s report (document S/2013/357) on that subject and called on the Iraqi Government to give the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) any information available on the Kuwaiti and third-country nationals, and to facilitate the ICRC’s access to them and their remains, as well as the ICRC’s search for missing persons and property, including Kuwait’s national archives.


    Further to the text, the Council asked the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) to facilitate efforts towards that end. It also asked the Secretary-General to consider charging his Deputy Special Representative at UNAMI covering political affairs to oversee Iraq-Kuwait issues.

    ~
    UNAMI AND THE RED CROSS WILL BE WORKING TO MAKE SURE THIS GETS DONE. ~RED LILY


    Following the adoption, Hoshyar Zebar, Iraq’s Foreign Minister, said the text marked a turning point in Iraq’s relationship with the international community and a significant step in Iraq’s and Kuwait’s joint efforts to mend bilateral ties. Further, it illustrated that Iraq had fulfilled all its obligations under Chapter VII of the Charter.


    “All the negative aspects of the relationship between the countries have become part of the past. We will focus on the present and the future, and what the brotherly relations can achieve to consolidate peace, security and stability in the region,” Mr. Zebar said.


    A joint ministerial committee to maintain border markers had already been set up, he said. Moving forward, they would work together to achieve sustainable development. The international community’s support was needed to aid that process, as well as to help the two nations win the war on terrorism and defeat religious extremism.


    The meeting began at 11:04 a.m. and ended at 11:21 a.m.




    Resolution


    The full text of resolution 2107 (2013) reads as follows:

    ~I have added brief descriptions for each resolution for
    ALL of us to BETTER understand the meaning of all of this.

    Links to original documents are embedded in each resolution number posted in blue.. ~RED LILY~


    “The Security Council,


    “Recalling its relevant resolutions on the situation between Iraq and Kuwait, in particular resolutions 686 (1991), 687 (1991), 833 (1993), and 1284 (1999), and the reports of the Secretary-General pursuant to paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999),




    I added explanations of the resolutions listed in the above paragraph:

    Resolution 686: Recalling paragraph 9 of resolution 661 (1990) regarding assistance to the Government of Kuwait and paragraph 3 (c) of that resolution regarding supplies strictly for medical purposes and, in humanitarian circumstances, foodstuffs, ----- Taking note of the letters of the Foreign Minister of Iraq confirming Iraq's agreement to comply fully with all of the resolutions noted above (S/22275), and stating its intention to release prisoners of war immediately (S/22273),

    Resolution 687:
    Recalling that in its resolution 687 (1991) the Council declared that a ceasefire would be based on acceptance by Iraq of the provisions of that resolution, including the obligations on Iraq contained therein,

    3 Apr 1991Security Council resolution 687 (1991), Section C, decides that Iraq shall unconditionally accept, under international supervision, the destruction, removal or rendering harmless of its weapons of mass destruction, ballistic missiles with a range over 150 kilometres, and related production facilities and equipment. It also provides for establishment of a system of ongoing monitoring and verification of Iraq’s compliance with the ban on these weapons and missiles. Requires Iraq to make a declaration, within 15 days, of the location, amounts and types of all such items.

    ~Basically agreeing on a ceasefire with Kuwait and Iraq agreeing to help restore Kuwait after the unlawful invasion..~RED LILY~ (source resolution 687)

    Resolution 833: Recalling the report of the Secretary-General dated 2 May 1991 concerning the establishment of the United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Boundary Demarcation

    Resolution 1284:
    the approval by the Council in its resolution 715 (1991) of the plans for future ongoing monitoring and verification submitted by the Secretary-General and the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in pursuance of paragraphs 10 and 13 of resolution 687 (1991), RESOLUTION 1284 (1999)




    RESUME ARTICLE:




    “Recognizing that the situation that now exists in Iraq is significantly different from that which existed at the time of the adoption of resolution 661(EX: RESTORED KUWAIT'S SOVEREIGNTY ~RL) (1990), and further recognizing the importance of Iraq achieving international standing equal to that which it held prior to the adoption of resolution 661 (1990),


    Welcoming Iraq’s continued demonstration of its commitment to the full implementation of its outstanding obligations under the relevant Chapter VII resolutions, namely the continuation of payment of the outstanding amount of compensation administered by the United Nations Compensation Commission, and both Iraq and Kuwait’s efforts to advance regional stability, and welcoming also all the positive steps that have been taken by the Government of Iraq to fulfil resolution 833 (1993),


    “Welcoming further the ongoing cooperation between Iraq and Kuwait in the search for missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals within the framework of the Tripartite Commission and its Technical Subcommittee under the auspices of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), and the positive efforts by the Government of Iraq regarding the return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains, and the return of Kuwaiti property,


    “Reiterating the need for continued efforts to locate and repatriate missing Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, through the Iraqi interministerial committee established for this purpose,


    “Expressing its deep appreciation to the late Ambassador Yuli Vorontsov and Ambassador Gennady Tarasov, who in the capacity of High-level Coordinator, devoted their time and professional skills to carrying out the mandate outlined in paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999) and ensuring that its implementation built trust between Iraq and Kuwait and contributed to the full normalization of their relations,


    “Noting that the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) includes advising, supporting, and assisting the Government of Iraq in facilitating regional dialogue,

    UNAMI WILL STILL BE THERE monitoring the situation as it stands now working along side the Red Cross. ~RED LILY~



    With consideration to the provisions ofChapter VI of the Charter of the United Nations on the pacific settlement of disputes,


    “1. Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General of 17 June 2013 (S/2013/357) and the letters from the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the State of Kuwait (S/2013/323, annex and S/2013/324, annex) and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Iraq (S/2013/357, annexes II and III) to the Secretary-General;

    THE FOLLOWING is a nice little summary of what will be monitored under Chapter 6: RL



    “2. Calls upon the Government of Iraq, in furtherance of its commitment to facilitate the repatriation of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals referred to in paragraph 30 of resolution 687 (1991), to continue cooperation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) by providing any information of such persons, facilitating the access of ICRC to all such persons wherever they might be and facilitating the search by ICRC for those Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains still unaccounted for, and to continue efforts to search for missing Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, through its interministerial committee;


    “3. Decides, under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, to terminate the measures in paragraphs 2 (c), 2 (d) and 3 (c) of resolution 686 (1991), paragraph 30 of resolution 687 (1991) and the arrangements set forth in paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999), and reaffirmed in subsequent relevant resolutions;

    (THE ABOVE PARAGRAPHS AND RESOLUTIONS ARE TERMINATED.. OVER.. DONE.. HISTORY under Chapter 6.. imo ~RED LILY~ )



    “4. Requests that the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission to Iraq (UNAMI) promote, support and facilitate efforts regarding the repatriation or return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals or their remains, and the return of Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, seized by Iraq, further requests the Secretary-General to report separately to the Security Council on these matters in his reports on the progress made towards the fulfilment of all UNAMI’s responsibilities, and also requests that the Secretary-General consider designating the Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General at UNAMI covering political affairs with the responsibility for overseeing these issues and ensuring appropriate resources for this purpose;


    “5. Expresses its intention to review the modalities of the reporting referred to in operative paragraph 4 of this resolution, upon the eventual termination of UNAMI’s mandate, with a view towards considering a continued role for the United Nations in such matters if needed;


    “6. Decides to remain seized of the matter.”

    UNITED NATIONS SITE LINK
    Last edited by RED LILY; 06-29-2013 at 05:27 PM.



  2. #2
    RED LILY
    Guest

    Chapter 6 of the UN Charter

    CHAPTER VI: PACIFIC SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES




    Article 33


    The parties to any dispute, the continuance of which is likely to endanger the maintenance of international peace and security, shall, first of all, seek a solution by negotiation, enquiry, mediation, conciliation, arbitration, judicial settlement, resort to regional agencies or arrangements, or other peaceful means of their own choice.


    The Security Council shall, when it deems necessary, call upon the parties to settle their dispute by such means.


    Article 34


    The Security Council may investigate any dispute, or any situation which might lead to international friction or give rise to a dispute, in order to determine whether the continuance of the dispute or situation is likely to endanger the maintenance of international peace and security.


    Article 35


    Any Member of the United Nations may bring any dispute, or any situation of the nature referred to in Article 34, to the attention of the Security Council or of the General Assembly.


    A state which is not a Member of the United Nations may bring to the attention of the Security Council or of the General Assembly any dispute to which it is a party if it accepts in advance, for the purposes of the dispute, the obligations of pacific settlement provided in the present Charter.


    The proceedings of the General Assembly in respect of matters brought to its attention under this Article will be subject to the provisions of Articles 11 and 12.


    Article 36


    The Security Council may, at any stage of a dispute of the nature referred to in Article 33 or of a situation of like nature, recommend appropriate procedures or methods of adjustment.


    The Security Council should take into consideration any procedures for the settlement of the dispute which have already been adopted by the parties.


    In making recommendations under this Article the Security Council should also take into consideration that legal disputes should as a general rule be referred by the parties to the International Court of Justice in accordance with the provisions of the Statute of the Court.


    Article 37


    Should the parties to a dispute of the nature referred to in Article 33 fail to settle it by the means indicated in that Article, they shall refer it to the Security Council.


    If the Security Council deems that the continuance of the dispute is in fact likely to endanger the maintenance of international peace and security, it shall decide whether to take action under Article 36 or to recommend such terms of settlement as it may consider appropriate.


    Article 38


    Without prejudice to the provisions of Articles 33 to 37, the Security Council may, if all the parties to any dispute so request, make recommendations to the parties with a view to a pacific settlement of the dispute.

  3. #3
    RED LILY
    Guest

    UN Document: S/2013/357

    United Nations S/2013/357
    Security Council Distr.: General
    17 June 2013




    Original: English
    13-36143 (E) 180613 190613 *1336143*


    Thirty-fifth report of the Secretary-General pursuant to paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999)


    I. Introduction


    1. The present report is submitted pursuant to paragraph 14 of Security Council resolution 1284 (1999) and covers developments pertaining to the issues of missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and missing Kuwaiti property, including its national archives, since the issuance of my previous report, dated 14 December 2012 (S/2012/931).


    2. Following the High-level Coordinator’s briefing to the Security Council on 18 December 2012, the Council did not come to a decision on a way forward on the mandate set out in paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999), nor did it agree to extend financing of the activities to implement the mandate.


    3. In my letter to the Security Council dated 10 January 2013 (S/2013/13), I stressed my commitment to the implementation of the mandate. I noted that until such time as the Council reached an agreement on a way forward that would permit the use of funds from the escrow account, I would draw on existing staff and resources in an ad hoc manner to undertake activities aimed at fulfilling the mandate in paragraph 14 of resolution 1284 (1999).


    4. Subsequently, on 4 February 2013, the Under-Secretary-General for PoliticalAffairs informed both the Permanent Representative of Kuwait to the United Nations, Mansour Alotaibi, and the then Permanent Representative of Iraq to the United Nations, Hamid Al Bayati, of the decision to assign Victor Poliakov, Senior Political Affairs Officer in the Department of Political Affairs, to temporarily and technically follow the dossier of the High-level Coordinator. The Senior Political Affairs Officer was tasked with visiting Kuwait and Iraq to meet with officials and ascertain the latest developments with regard to the issues relevant to the mandate.


    II. Recent activities with regard to the repatriation and return of all Kuwaiti and third-country nationals, or their remains


    5. The period under review was marked by the completion of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary maintenance project pursuant to Security Council resolution 833 (1993)and substantial progress towards the settlement of the matter concerning the Iraqi private citizens and their assets that remained on Kuwaiti territory following the S/2013/357



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    13-36143 demarcation of the international boundary, as referred to in Security Council resolution 899 (1994). While those developments were not directly linked to the humanitarian issues outlined in paragraph 14 of Council resolution 1284 (1999), they constituted important confidence-building steps towards the further normalization of bilateral relations between Iraq and Kuwait.


    6. Against this positive background and with a view to exercising his temporary responsibilities for the dossier of the High-level Coordinator, the Senior Political Affairs Officer visited Kuwait from 5 to 7 March and Kuwait and Iraq from 24 to 30 April. In Iraq, he was received by Hamid Ahmed, Acting Chief of Staff of the Office of the Prime Minister. He also met with Mohammed Shyaa Al-Sudani,Minister of Human Rights; Mohammed Hamoud, Ambassador in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with responsibility for Iraq-Kuwait issues; and members of the diplomatic corps in Baghdad. On the sidelines of the seventy-ninth session of the Technical Subcommittee of the Tripartite Commission, held in Kuwait, as well as in the course of his visit to Iraq, the Senior Political Affairs Officer met with Arkan Saleh, Deputy Minister of Human Rights and Head of the Iraqi delegation to the Technical Subcommittee.


    7. In Baghdad, the Minister of Human Rights noted the importance that Iraq attached to the humanitarian issue of finding and repatriating the remains of Kuwaiti and third-country nationals. Iraqi officials emphasized that the Prime Minister had made it clear that no effort should be spared to that end, a message that the Acting Chief of Staff had asked the Senior Political Affairs Officer to convey to the latter’s interlocutors in Kuwait. In discussions with Iraqi interlocutors, the Senior Political Affairs Officer noted that carrying out field operations aimed at finding the remains of the Kuwaiti missing persons in the next few weeks would be essential in further building trust between Iraq and Kuwait and improving the chances for the two countries to arrive at a mutually acceptable modality for the future of the mandate.


    8. Mr. Saleh provided the Senior Political Affairs Officer with a comprehensivelist of Iraqi field operations in 2013 aimed at locating mass graves containing theremains of missing Kuwaiti nationals. From 16 to 22 March 2013, the Iraqi teamsurveyed the Khamisiyah site in Dhi Qar Governorate, where 14 burial sites wereidentified. Excavations are to occur in the second half of 2013. In the beginning of June, the Senior Political Affairs Officer was informed by the Permanent Mission of Iraq to the United Nations that excavations had started at the Khamisiyah site on 25 May.


    9. In April 2013, a specialized team of the Ministry of Human Rights of Iraq began surveying and excavating at a site in Wasit Governorate. On 3 April,excavations started at four mass grave sites, but it became apparent that those did not contain the remains of Kuwaiti missing persons. Military uniforms found in the graves indicated that they belonged to Iraqi soldiers. Nevertheless, samples were taken and sent to the National Forensics Institute of Iraq for analysis. From 5 to 10 April, possible burial sites were explored, surveyed and excavated in Samawa, Muthanna Governorate, but no skeletal material was found. The planned excavations in Salman Pak, 15 km south of Baghdad, were postponed for security reasons. At one location traces of chemical contamination had reportedly been found, and additional analyses were needed to obtain clearance before further work could be conducted. S/2013/35713-36143



    3




    10. During the visit of the Senior Political Affairs Officer, the Minister of Human Rights noted that Iraq would continue its work regarding the missing Kuwaiti persons as long as it was needed and that a lack of quality information about the location of mass graves containing their remains was hampering the search. Other Iraqi interlocutors added that witnesses had gone overseas, did not want to or feel safe to cooperate, and at times were evasive (e.g. asking for more money, switching off phones) when the moment came to debrief them.


    11. Iraqi officials stressed that while Iraq was committed to finding the remains ofthe missing Kuwaiti persons and had shown goodwill and determination to that endby conducting extensive field operations, the continuation of this mandate under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations was not conducive to restoring the country’s international standing prior to the adoption of Security Council resolution 661 (1990).


    12. In Kuwait, the Senior Political Affairs Officer was received by Mohammed Abdulla Abulhasan, Adviser in the Amiri Diwan; and Khalid Mohammed Al-Maqamis, Director, Coordination and Follow-up Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He met with Ali Al-Mumin, Ambassador of Kuwait to Iraq; the Chairman and the members of the National Committee for Missing Persons and Prisoners of War Affairs; and members of the diplomatic corps, including Mohammed Hussein Mohammed Bahr Aluloom, Ambassador of Iraq to Kuwait.


    13. The Chairman and the members of the National Committee for Missing Persons and Prisoners of War Affairs summarized for the Senior Political Affairs Officer the outcome of the seventy-ninth session of the Technical Subcommittee,held in Kuwait on 25 April. At the session, discussions focused on the Iraqi missions to Khamisiyah with a view to preparing for excavations. It was proposed that search activities be increased in the Karbala and Samawa areas, which were visited by the Kuwaiti technical teams in 2003 and 2004 and where the remains of Kuwaiti and third-country nationals had been unearthed. The members of the National Committee reiterated the importance of receiving from the United States of America satellite imagery relating to 1991 and earlier, which could facilitate the location of mass graves. It was noted that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Iraq was to request from the Russian Federation imagery of the Khamisiyah site dating back to 1990 and 1991.


    14. The National Committee for Missing Persons and Prisoners of War Affairsrecalled that it had provided the Iraqi side with pictures of former Iraqi securityofficers believed to possess information about the burial sites and the coordinates ofthe known mass graves. The Senior Political Affairs Officer was told that theUniversity of Alabama, in the United States, had developed new technology to analyse changes in the soil, which could help with the search for Kuwaiti and Iraqi human remains.


    15. While commending the current search activities of Iraq, the National Committee for Missing Persons and Prisoners of War Affairs noted that all the 236 identified remains of missing persons and third-country nationals had been found by Kuwaiti specialized teams during search and exhumation operations in 2003 and 2004 in Karbala, Ramadi, Samawa, Nasseriya and at other sites. The National Committee underlined the need for Iraq to meet its commitments in the search for missing Kuwaiti nationals and achieve practical results, thereby expediting the realization of its international obligations in relation to the mandate.


    S/2013/357


    4




    13-36143
    Last edited by RED LILY; 06-28-2013 at 08:35 AM.

  4. #4
    Looks like it is official... I am sure the Iraqi people are glad that this chapter is over... Thanks Red...

  5. #5
    RED LILY
    Guest
    S/2013/357
    4

    13-36143


    16. Kuwaiti interlocutors stressed that the issue of missing persons remains a
    highly sensitive and emotional matter in Kuwait. The families of those whose
    remains have not been found and properly buried in Kuwait continue to live in pain
    and experience distress. They have the sympathy and support of Kuwaiti society.


    17. Kuwaiti officials informed the Senior Political Affairs Officer that Kuwait was
    interested in developing good-neighbourly relations with Iraq and did not want Iraq
    to remain unnecessarily under Chapter VII, provided that Iraq fulfilled its
    outstanding obligations related to boundary maintenance and payment of
    compensation to the Iraqi farmers, a position spelled out in the letter of
    17 September 2012 from the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Kuwait to the Minister
    for Foreign Affairs of Iraq, as referred to in paragraph 17 of my thirty-fourth report
    (S/2012/931). It was stressed that the national interest of Kuwait lay solely in the
    necessity of finding and returning missing Kuwaitis, or their remains, as well as
    archives, and having for that purpose a United Nations-supervised mechanism with
    reporting responsibilities to the Security Council. Mr. Abulhasan observed that
    oversight by the United Nations gave strength and credibility to the activities
    associated with the search for missing Kuwaiti nationals and property.
    III. Recent activities with regard to the return of
    Kuwaiti property


    18. No credible facts or possible leads have emerged regarding the missing
    Kuwaiti national archives, whose return Kuwait considers essential, given their
    value for the history of the country. While in Iraq, the Senior Political Affairs
    Officer discussed the issue with Khalid Faisal Habeeb, Director of the
    Compensation and Properties Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
    Mohammed Khudair al-Anbare, Deputy Head of the Legal Division of the Ministry
    of Foreign Affairs; and other Iraqi officials. In Kuwait, he met in turn with Nasser
    Al-Hayen, Deputy Director of the International Organizations Department, which is
    responsible in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the file of the return of Kuwaiti
    properties and archives.


    19. The Iraqi interlocutors gave their assurance that Iraq had no interest in or
    intention of keeping any Kuwaiti property or using it for political ends. A concerted
    effort had been made to find properties and investigate the fate of the archives.


    Every item recovered was immediately returned to Kuwait, and considerable
    rewards had been announced and paid as an incentive to Iraqi citizens to come
    forward with items or information. The Senior Political Affairs Officer was provided
    with the list of items (annex I) found by Iraq and returned from 2002 to 2012 to
    Kuwait. On 8 May, I was informed by Mohamed Ali al-Hakim, Permanent
    Representative of Iraq to the United Nations, that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of
    Iraq intended to deliver to Kuwait 57 tapes from the Kuwaiti Television
    Corporation, about 400 books, three albums with photographs of members of the
    Government of Kuwait and silverware stamped with the logo of the State of Kuwait.
    20. Being aware that both Iraq and Kuwait had established committees on the
    Kuwaiti national archives and other properties, the Senior Political Affairs Officer
    considered it important to encourage the holding of a joint meeting of those bodies
    as soon as possible, with a view to exchanging information and coordinating the
    way forward. Upon returning to United Nations Headquarters, he was informed by a
    S/2013/357


    13-36143



    5



    communication from Iraq that the committees had convened on 15 May in the
    Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Kuwait. The Iraqi delegation was headed by the
    Ambassador of Iraq to Kuwait, and the Kuwaiti delegation was led by the Director
    of the International Organizations Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
    21. The Iraqi delegation expressed its Government’s determination to resolve all
    outstanding issues pertaining to missing Kuwaiti properties and archives. It
    requested the Kuwaiti side to provide a description of the missing items from the
    archives of the Amiri Diwan, the Diwan of the Crown Prince and the Ministry of
    Foreign Affairs. The Kuwaiti side commended the efforts made by the relevant Iraqi
    authorities towards finding and returning Kuwaiti properties. Kuwait suggested that
    regular, quarterly meetings of the joint committee be held to discuss relevant
    developments. During the meeting, the items referred to in paragraph 19 were
    handed over to Kuwait.


    IV. Observations


    22. The recent fulfilment by Iraq of its outstanding Chapter VII obligations related
    to its common border with Kuwait has put in place conditions conducive to greater
    progress in the relations between the two countries. There is thus a constructive
    atmosphere in which to decide the future of the mandate set out in paragraph 14 of
    Security Council resolution 1284 (1999). The objectives of the mandate have not yet
    been met, despite the Iraqi authorities’ strong commitment and efforts to deliver on
    both the Kuwaiti missing persons and property issues.


    23. As for the future of the mandate, I would like to recall the four options for
    carrying out the functions of the mandate, as contained in paragraph 25 of my thirtyfourth
    report (S/2012/931): asking the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq
    (UNAMI) to fulfil this role; appointing an interim coordinator; replacing the Highlevel
    Coordinator; or assigning someone from United Nations Headquarters to
    assume the functions. In my previous report, I expressed hope that Kuwait and Iraq
    would come to a mutually acceptable arrangement on the issue. In its press
    statement of 20 June 2012 (SC/10680), the Security Council encouraged both sides
    to reach this most favourable outcome.


    24. In connection with the future of the issue referred to in paragraph 14 of
    Security Council resolution 1284 (1999), Nuri Kamel al-Maliki, the Prime Minister
    of Iraq, was of the opinion that the mandate of the High-level Coordinator needed to
    be ended and the matter transferred to UNAMI (see annex II). The Prime Minister
    also noted that his country’s obligations under Chapter VII with regard to Kuwaiti
    property, the Kuwaiti archives and missing Kuwaitis and third-country nationals
    should be ended and those issues addressed under Chapter VI of the Charter.


    Furthermore, Hoshyar Zebari, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Iraq, informed me in a
    letter dated 30 May 2013 that an agreement had been reached with Kuwait during
    his recent visit to the country to transfer the responsibility for the issues of Kuwaiti
    prisoners and missing persons and Kuwaiti property to UNAMI under Chapter VI
    (see annex III).


    25. Outlining the views of his Government, Sheikh Sabah Khaled Al Hamad
    Al Sabah, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Kuwait, noted
    that Kuwait supported the proposal to ask UNAMI to follow up on the issue of
    S/2013/357


    6

    13-36143



    missing persons and that of missing Kuwaiti property, including the national
    archives, in accordance with Chapter VI (see S/2013/324, annex).


    26. The Minister for Foreign Affairs of Iraq also indicated in his letter that in the
    event that the mission of UNAMI came to an end, the representative of the
    Secretariat could remain in his functions if necessary. The Deputy Prime Minister
    and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Kuwait also underlined that the Security Council
    should adopt a resolution that contained the following principal elements: (a) the
    follow-up of those issues would not end with the termination of the mandate of
    UNAMI; (b) the periodic reports of the Secretary-General on the issues of missing
    Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and missing Kuwaiti property, including the
    national archives, should be submitted on dates other than those of his reports on the
    activities of UNAMI; and (c) a UNAMI official whose sole responsibility would be
    to follow up on those issues should be designated (see S/2013/324, annex).


    27. The common ground attained by Iraq and Kuwait regarding the issue of
    missing Kuwaiti persons and property is a significant achievement, signalling a new
    level of mutual trust and a fresh chapter in the relations between the two
    neighbouring countries.


    28. Having carefully considered the views expressed by Iraq and Kuwait about the
    future of the mandate set out in paragraph 14 of Security Council resolution 1284
    (1999) and noting their broad commonality, I would like to recommend to the
    Council that the mandate of the High-level Coordinator be terminated and its
    functions transferred to UNAMI, to be carried out under Chapter VI of the Charter. I
    take note of the proposals made by Iraq and Kuwait referred to in paragraph 26
    above. Should the Council adopt a resolution, I will ensure its full implementation.


    29. The Governments of Iraq and Kuwait have demonstrated statesmanship and
    respect for each other’s national interests in reaching a mutually acceptable and
    beneficial arrangement. Should the Security Council agree with my
    recommendation, Iraq will exit Chapter VII with regard to this file and will be one
    step closer to restoring its international standing prior to resolution 661 (1990), an
    objective long sought by the leadership of the country following the removal of the
    regime of Saddam Hussein. The transfer of responsibilities for the facilitation of the
    search for the missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals, or their remains, to
    UNAMI ensures the continued work on this humanitarian file under Chapter VI.


    30. The issue of missing persons has ethical, legal and humanitarian implications
    for Kuwait, as stated in the letter of its Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for
    Foreign Affairs (see S/2013/324, annex). The open cases continue to cause suffering
    to the bereaved families. I have taken note of the commendable commitment of Iraq
    to the successful resolution of this issue and its active field engagement to that end.
    It is my hope that the continued concrete actions of Iraq on the ground will expedite
    the realization of practical results while reinforcing confidence between Iraq and
    Kuwait. This will certainly advance the humanitarian objective of uncovering the
    fate of the missing persons, grim though it may be, and informing their families.


    31. Moreover, any future activities on this file should take into account that the
    Tripartite Commission, chaired by the International Committee of the Red Cross,
    remains the primary, independent and fair international mechanism for dealing with
    the issue of missing persons. Close contact and coordination with its members is a
    prerequisite to achieving positive results in settling this longstanding humanitarian
    issue.


    S/2013/357


    13-36143


    7


    More here LINK

  6. #6
    War sure is ugly, and so much suffering... Too bad we have to learn lessons the hard way.. And even still, we never learn from them... Jesus Christ's return to establish God's eternal kingdom to this earth is the only permanent solution to mankind's problem... Which is we have never been successful at governing ourselves... We need our Creator to rule over us... We were created for His good pleasure, and one day mankind will understanding that God always had our best interest at heart... Too influenced by sin to really grasp this reality is the reason our world is in such a mess...

  7. #7
    RED LILY
    Guest
    With the end of the stage the international trusteeship assurances on the comprehensive development after the enjoyment of the full sovereignty of Iraq economic


    29/06/2013 12:00 AM




    BAGHDAD - Hussein Tamimi ثغب - Mustafa al-Hashemi after local and international consensus on Iraq exceeded the provisions of Chapter VII and entered the international incubator, and its impact on economic development and became the world enjoys the confidence and freedom of control over his money.


    Expressed by many experts are optimistic reflection on the Iraqi economy is positive, he said the President of the International Economic Developmental Ali Hilfi (morning) that the next phase will witness the revival of the Iraqi economy by opening up to the outside world, pointing out that witnessed the corridors of the UN تهان accepted Iraqi delegation of most delegations year, if not all shows how important the decision on Iraq's relations with countries around the world.


    yard work Iraqi


    He pointed out that all member states of the Organization of the United Nations recognizes the importance of Iraq on the global economy and there has operating companies in the country and other is looking forward to enter the arena of Iraq, especially after the Iraq became state that does not threaten international peace and is seen as a friend of the peoples of the world turned the page a bitter conflict with the remnants of the former regime, which had exhausted Iraq politically and economically.



    The UN Security Council voted unanimously, on Thursday evening last day on June 27 being on the exit of Iraq from Chapter VII, and to refer the issues related to Chapter VI, the Council decided to end the measures provided for in "some" paragraphs of UN resolutions 686 and 687 adopted by the Council in 1991 after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.

    LET'S LOOK AT THE RESOLUTIONS THEY ENDED:


    RESOLUTION 686


    (a) Rescind immediately its actions purporting to annex Kuwait; MORE: SOURCE LINK
    RESOLUTION 687

    3 Apr 1991 Security Council resolution 687 (1991), Section C, decides that Iraq shall unconditionally accept, under international supervision, the destruction, removal or rendering harmless of its weapons of mass destruction, ballistic missiles with a range over 150 kilometres, and related production facilities and equipment. It also provides for establishment of a system of ongoing monitoring and verification of Iraq’s compliance with the ban on these weapons and missiles. Requires Iraq to make a declaration, within 15 days, of the location, amounts and types of all such items.


    SO IT LOOKS AS THOUGH WE WILL NO LONGER BE MONITORING WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION FOR IRAQ. IMO ~RED LILY






    RESUME ARTICLE:

    reconstruction of infrastructure For her part, researcher economic Suhad virgins: the liberation of Iraq from its international obligations would make him focused on the reconstruction of infrastructure and the establishment of projects that will absorb and reduce the proportion of widespread unemployment among young people.


    indicated in a statement (morning): to leave Iraq of Chapter VII will make it an oasis singing of strategic projects, which is in dire need them, as well as he will see a commercial activity unrivaled due to the influx of foreign companies to him after the restriction Chapter VII prevent them from entering the power to exercise their economic activities varied.


    incubator is ideal for investments and confirmed that it would be a country with a potential of a powerful few years after Actual direct reconstruction, and expected virgins that if the speed of reform of economic laws currently in force, Iraq will be one of the best economies in the world because it has the elements of an excellent qualify him to be the incubator ideal for foreign investment. ,


    and pointed to the need to preserve this done and incarnation projects on the ground through speed up the reform of laws and dismantling of the cross and interlaced them to allow investors and foreign companies to the implementation of their projects Almtovqh or deferred because of these overlaps and intersections between the laws of economics.


    events of sustainable development to the said economic expert Hadi هنداس that the country is now the kiss of true corporate global investment competing for access to Iraq which is one of the largest markets in the world, noting that the country has become able to events of sustainable development and economic and social health in all areas of life.


    And the return of the country to foster the international community after more than two decades is a positive thing gives the country the ability to economic advancement after fulfilled all its international obligations and this opens up wider in economic transactions. , and pointed out that Khurj from the provisions of Chapter VII would gain international huge being able to control the entire on economic sovereignty and that is freedom of trade and move the money to import goods without the need for the international mediator as it gets during the last period.


    Pointing out that the bypass provisions of Chapter VII lead the country toward greater freedom in dealing with its assets frozen in international banks and removes him all restrictions that determine advancement and economic development.


    new responsibilities either echoes of newspapers around the world was coming out of the provisions of Chapter VII puts Iraq before the challenges and new responsibilities, Perhaps most notably the protection of his money in overseas lawsuits, especially those affected by the invasion of Saddam Hussein's regime of Kuwait in 1990.


    while Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari, a statement to Al-Iraqiya that Iraq was checked Balastairadat task in public and economic life, and it was he can not import devices and equipment necessary for the work laboratories and joints of production, etc., indicating that control our money and our property and build our defense capabilities and buy weapons and maintain the rule of the country this was one of the contraband on Iraq, the country is on the verge of the status of the largest in the eyes of the world and will give us more credibility in front of the international community.


    return of international companies, director of foreign companies in the Ministry of Trade Huda Ali confirmed that since it began pointed out Iraq from Chapter VII and headed the United Nations by announcing his release from the provisions of Chapter VII began a number of large foreign companies (which projects were implemented strategy giant previously in Iraq) to come and install their feet again and to seek contracts with large Government to implement infrastructure projects, after it was the consequences of Chapter VII prevent it only by international mediators.

    Iraq is the arena promising for foreign investment at the moment, in spite of all the circumstances surrounding it, but he and since 2003 began major countries to send its giant to Iraq to work in construction projects and the advancement of the infrastructure destroyed by wars and misguided policies that put him under the tutelage of the United Nations and تكبيله restrictions Iraq was indispensable for access in and submit to international sanctions have hurt its economy very much for many years.


    growing air activity and despite the fact that political and economic conditions were not stable in the country for decades, but the signs of hope renaissance economic looming and foremost was after the change and the beginning of the entry of foreign companies and the growing prepared registered in the Ministry of Commerce, which is hoped to double after the departure of Iraq's proven Chapter VII in addition to the growing air activity and re offices of airlines, Arab and foreign to work in country. ,


    where 2003 saw record 6 foreign companies - as reported by the Department of Company Registration Department in foreign Ministry of Commerce - despite the fact that the general atmosphere and the situation prevailing at that time was not stable at all and did not help the advent of companies not even direct reconstruction. ,


    but he nonetheless , this is a point in favor of Iraq recorded him, despite the conditions of unstable, it is a country attractive for investment and fertile ground for the establishment of giant projects in which he also represents a golden opportunity for foreign companies, is likely she is suffering from economic crises, which seeks to compensate through contracts for the implementation of major projects in Iraq. doubled the number of companies and the number of foreign companies registered in the year 2004 two hundred companies have been recorded in the same circle and after the relative stability experienced by that year.


    They pointed out that many of the airlines, Arab and foreign, reopened its offices in Baghdad after recorded in our circle, noting that he certainly would double the number after that came out of Iraq from Chapter VII of the UN Charter المتاحدة and move to Chapter VI of it.

    reported that the preparation companies that have been recorded during the year 2012 amounted to 457 foreign companies a variety of disciplines, including oil companies and other Construction and reconstruction of infrastructure and electricity, noting that the record companies until the middle of this year amounted to 162 and it is hoped to increase its presence in Iraq after the United Nations announced that Iraq no longer poses a a threat to international peace and security.


    ended the international trusteeship MP Mansour al-Tamimi said in a press statement: It is important today that Iraq out of Chapter VII and the government should invest so heavily even plays Iraq role of regional and international dramatically in favor of his people, and ended with this international trusteeship on Iraq, which were imposed during the era of the dictatorial regime dictatorial, especially after the invasion of Kuwait. ,


    and added that this day will be a history of a landmark in the relationship between Iraq and the international community and indicates that the decisions of Chapter VII became part of the past and that this date would be a qualitative development in the relationship between Iraq and Kuwait, and all the negative aspects of the relationship between them are of the past, because we focus on the present and the future of our relationship with him.



    http://www.alsabaah.iq/ArticleShow.aspx?ID=49224

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