" The Dinar Daily " .......... Friday, 26 April 2013
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  1. #1

    " The Dinar Daily " .......... Friday, 26 April 2013

    Election law saves small forces and al-Maliki lose some influence
    26-04-2013 | (Voice of Iraq)

    Talk | David Ali | Baghdad |
    Closed or provincial elections, but still violet colored ink fingers participated pending Mastesfr of him voting process.
    Preliminary results of the elections were distributed to the political entities in CDs at noon on 22 April by the Electoral Commission and informed them "talk" where he showed the number of seats obtained by the electoral lists, according to the initial screening process.
    Results Ahtutea drive stating also that lists Iraq in all its branches scattered got about 70 seats out of 378 seats spread over 12 counties, while he "Sadrists 50 seats, and won the state law, 115 seats, while the share of the Islamic Supreme Council 80 seats.
    He says political writer Ihsan Al Shammari's "Talk" The preliminary results confirm that the "al-Maliki had planned to test his ability in the local elections to achieve uniqueness high in harvesting seats make it in indispensable for any partner to form a government, but he discovers today that what he wants is very difficult"
    But Adnan al-Sarraj, head of the Iraqi Center for Media Development, does not agree with this view, and find that the accounts of the political majority will only be present in the legislative elections in 2014.
    Sarraj says the "debate" that "the political debate in the provinces will be limited to the file services and investment projects."
    Revelation initial These results indicate the failure of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki to achieve the majority of political qualify for the formation of local governments, despite receiving a large percentage of the votes, the second is the return of Ammar al-Hakim, leader of the Supreme Council of the scene from the new, in exchange for exposure Muqtada al-Sadr to losses unexpected.
    Another indicator that several observers that the most important and deserves a lot of reading was the rise of civilian and liberal powers to local councils at a rate two to three seats in the majority of provinces thanks to the recent amendment to the election law.
    But the writer and political analyst, Aziz Jabr not find significant shifts in the map of political forces, says the "discussion" that "index participation is encouraging impose a different reading can not be talking about broad representation in the provincial councils, and this also means that the winners of the round election are not the winners of the reality. "
    Jabr is believed that the loss is a major negative shown by the Iraqi street from the elections as it no longer cares what is going on do not trust the efforts of change.
    The election commission said that turnout in the suffrage and up to 50 percent, but civil society organizations have had another opinion.
    Ali says Dujaili Network secretary of July to monitor the elections that "the turnout was weak, and we have indications through a network of observers in the country reported that the proceeds amounted to 37 per cent."



    Read more: http://translate.googleusercontent.c...#ixzz2RXPYzLoW



  2. #2
    Parliament sets replacement for IMN to transmit Sunday session
    Thursday, 25 April 2013 23:19 | | |

    Baghdad (AIN) –The Parliament Presidency identified a frequency for a television channel as a replacement in case that the Iraqi Media Network was unable to broadcast the special session of parliament devoted to discuss the events of Hawija next Sunday.

    A statement from the Department of Media in the parliament received by All Iraq News Agency (AIN) cited that "The Information Office of the President of the Parliament wishes to reveal for the media that in case the Iraqi Media Network was incapable of transmitting the special session of the parliament to be held next Sunday and to discuss the events of Hawija, the mentioned meeting will be broadcasted on Rasheed Satellite TV channel."

    http://www.alliraqnews.com/en/index....tical&Itemid=2

  3. #3
    Source: Adnan al-Asadi will cost the post of Director of the Office of Maliki

    Baghdad / Iraq News Network - the impact of the pressures suffered by al-Maliki due to poor management of the security file of the leaders of the Dawa Party, which was tasked Maliki joints management task of this file, said sources close to the leader of the Dawa Party, Ali al-Adeeb that there is a serious trend in removing Adnan al-Asadi the position of the senior agent for the Ministry of Interior, which mandated Maliki earlier than last year all the powers of the Ministry of the Interior, the source said Asadi probably cost management of the prime minister's office instead of Dr. Hamid al-Musawi. Who hold this position two years ago, succeeding Dr. Tariq star who farther because of a major corruption issues related to the file of Iraqi antiquities discovered in the private office of Prime Minister?.

    http://translate.googleusercontent.c...p0NTFCwJcrNzBg

  4. #4
    Sami al-Askari: Those who demanding Maliki resignation are dreaming.
    26/04/2013 11:50:00

    Baghdad/ NINA /-- MP Sami al-Askari for the State of Law coalition headed by PM, Nuri al-MALIKI said in a statement to today: " Breakthrough Hawija crisis subject to compliance by the parties of the opposition to the regime and respect the prestige of the army.

    He added , commenting on the claim made yesterday by Chairman of the Conference of Iraqi Sahwah /Awakening/, Sheikh Ahmed Abu Risha, for the resignation of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, means that Ahmed Abu Risha joined to the sectarian side , stressing that this side and all its followers are dreaming of ousted of al-Maliki or that he will resign from his post as PM ."

    http://www.ninanews.com/english/News...ar95_VQ=GHHMLF

  5. #5
    Misplaced Priorities in Iraq
    by DAVID ROMANO 7 hours ago

    When Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki sends his armed forces against peaceful Sunni demonstrators, when he breaks his promises about resolving the disputed territories issue in a constitutional manner, when he chooses not to create a national security council that Iyad Allawi (the top vote winner in the last election) was supposed to run, when he monopolizes all the powerful security-related ministerial posts, he is simply being rational and strategic. A very intelligent man, Mr. Maliki no doubt weighs the pros and cons of each of these policy choices before making them. If the presumed benefits to him and his goals outweigh the perceived costs of the policy, he goes forward with it.





    If the Americans still have interests in Iraq, it is their job to influence Mr. Maliki’s calculus. So far they seem to be doing a miserable job of it. Assuming that the United States wishes Iraq to remain stable and democratic, there are a number of things American diplomats and strategists could have done to prevent the current Iraqi slide into authoritarianism and renewed civil war. Behind closed doors, they could have told Mr. Maliki that they did not sacrifice so much blood and treasure just to see a new dictator emerge, especially one who is friendly with Iran. They did not win over Sunni Arab tribes and work with their Sahwa Awakening Councils against al-Qaeda just to see Mr. Maliki’s regime spark a renewed revolt. They did not protect the Kurdish Safe Haven from 1992 to 2003 just to see renewed conflict between the Kurds and Baghdad. After explaining their position to Mr. Maliki, they could make it very clear to him that should he insist on pursuing the path he seems to be on, the United States will support his rivals–including Sunni tribes in Anbar governorate and the Kurds in the north. This threat alone, if credibly made, should be enough to radically change Mr. Maliki’s cost-benefit calculus.




    If the Americans still have interests in Iraq, it is their job to influence Mr. Maliki’s calculus. So far they seem to be doing a miserable job of it.



    Unfortunately, I doubt anything even resembling such a threat was ever made by the Americans. That’s just not the Obama Administration’s style. It’s also probably not the preference of the American diplomatic and intelligence bureaucracies who increasingly direct Iraq policy now that the White House focuses on other issues more closely. Although skilled, very capable and mostly well-meaning public servants run these bureaucracies, they have always shown a preference for the central governments of recognized states, no matter how artificial, repressive and defunct the state in question. One might recall that following World War I, Arabists of the French and British bureaucracies created or helped in the establishment of over twenty Arab states, but they could not see fit to allow even a single Kurdish state. These bureaucracies were also very much against the creation of a single Jewish state, but were overruled by political leaders in Britain and the U.S., as well as the faits accomplits that the Zionists achieved in Palestine. Then, and perhaps still today, there were many more Gertrude Bells, T.E. Lawrences and Ernest Bevins then Edward Noels and Orde Wingates.



    As they did in the past, too often these bureaucracies view the Kurds (or Berbers and Baluchis, for instance) through a lense of double standards. It is of course largely true that the Kurds of yesterday and even today suffer from many divisions, from tribal to religious to political. I don’t understand, however, how this constituted a reason not to support the creation of a single Kurdish state when the Arabs were just as tribal and just as religiously and politically divided. Somehow some rag tag constellation of desert tribes in the Persian/Arab Gulf could get a dozen states just for promising to support the colonialists, but when the Kurds made the same promises they were deemed “not ready or sufficiently unified” for such things.



    The modern version of this story looks only slightly different: From the point of view of these Western bureaucracies, “the Kurdistan Regional Government in Erbil does not really consist of modern institutions. Sectarian, party and tribal loyalties play a more important role than any overarching Kurdish or Kurdistani nationalism and civic identity. The peshmerga are loyal to their party or tribal leaders and have not really been unified under KRG authority. Therefore we really shouldn’t get too close to them or count on them too much,” so the logic goes, “and they’re certainly not ready for real self-determination.” There may be some truth to parts of such an account, but isn’t this always the case for new, developing states, and even many an older state?




    Following World War I, Arabists of the French and British bureaucracies created or helped in the establishment of over twenty Arab states, but they could not see fit to allow even a single Kurdish state.



    What really seems beyond comprehension is the double standard at play here. We could just as easily describe the situation in Arab Iraq [or Syria, or Bahrain, or any number of others] similarly: “Iraq lacks modern institutions. Sectarian, party and tribal loyalties play a more important role than an overarching Iraqi nationalism or civic identity. The army is being built as a kind of praetorian guard directly loyal to the leader rather than to governing institutions. The Prime Minister and his party place only their own people into various ministries and offices, refusing to share power with others. ” Yet somehow the conclusion that follows this observation about politics in Baghdad remains “Therefore we should truly support and remain close to this government.”



    No matter what Mr. Maliki and his government party do, they somehow remain the preferred partner of the people in Washington. No wonder Mr. Maliki turned his back on power sharing in Baghdad, the 2005 Constitution and other promises.



    David Romano has been a Rudaw columnist since August 2010. He is the Thomas G. Strong Professor of Middle East Politics at Missouri State University and author of The Kurdish Nationalist Movement (2006, Cambridge University Press).


    ~~RED: IF THIS DOES NOT OPEN SOME OF THE "GURU'S EYES" NOTHING WILL. IT HAS BEEN MY OPINION ALL ALONG THE UNITED STATES HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE RV.. YES WE WENT THERE AND WE REMOVED A DICTATOR.. THAT WAS OUR ROLE.. NOW IT IS UP TO IRAQ TO PROVE TO THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY THAT THEY CAN PLAY NICE WITH OTHERS IMO... AND IT IS DEFINITELY UP TO THE IMF AND WORLD BANK TO DETERMINE THE COUNTRIES RATE OF CURRENCY. DOES ANYONE HAVE CONTACTS IN THOSE PLACES? LET ME JUST SAY PEOPLE THAT HIGH UP ARE NOT TALKING TO ANYONE.. THEY ARE NOT TALKING TO BANKERS, CURRENCY TRADERS OR THE LIKE.. THAT IS MY HUMBLE OPINION.. I HAVE READ AND STUDIED TOO MUCH TO THINK THE US IS IN CONTROL OF THIS RV...

    http://rudaw.net/english/opinion/26042013
    Last edited by RED LILY; 04-26-2013 at 01:36 PM.

  6. #6
    MP calls to resolve the three presidencies
    Friday, 26 April 2013 14:50

    Shafaq News / A member of the Iraqi parliament of Ahrar bloc affiliated to the Sadrist movement called on Friday to solve the three presidencies in the country to resolve the “sectarian strife” in which he held government of Nuri al –Maliki for its responsibility.

    Violent armed clashes carrying sectarian tendency took place in several provinces since last Tuesday between government forces and Sunni protesters demonstrating for nearly four months against the policies of Maliki’s government.

    “Iraq is passing through a dangerous place and needs a resolution quickly because it may be engaged in sectarian strife and the reason is the irresponsible actions of the government,” Hussein al-Mansouri, MP from Basra told “Shafaq News” .

    Mansouri called to “solve the three presidencies and form new caretaker presidencies,” adding, “the members of the Iraqi parliament must convene an emergency session to take these steps quickly due to what Iraq is going through now”.

    Clashes broke out on Tuesday after a military force stormed protesters Square in Haweeja district in Kirkuk province that left about 50 people dead and dozens wounded.

    Since that time, gunmen launched retaliatory attacks against government forces in Kirkuk and nearby provinces with a Sunni majority as such violence left more than 50 others dead, amid warnings of an outbreak of sectarian violence on a large scale.

    Sunni and Shiite Endowments have submitted an initiative to calm the situation and solve the crisis, but it seems that those efforts did not result in any good results amid calls from senior clerics to carry weapons to defend themselves in facing government forces.

    http://www.shafaaq.com/en/politics/5...idencies-.html

  7. #7
    Nijaifi suggests initiative to INA to settle Hawija crisis
    Friday, 26 April 2013 14:59 | | |

    Baghdad (AIN) –The parliament Speaker, Osama al-Nijaifi, suggested an initiative of two points to the Iraqi National Alliance to settle the crisis of Hawija district of Kirkuk province.

    A statement by Nijaifi's office received by AIN on Friday cited "Nijaifi received the Transportation Minister, Hadi al-Amiri, on Thursday night where they discussed the clashes that took place in Hawija district."

    "Nijaifi asked Amiri to convey his initiative to the INA that has two points and could safely settle the crisis in Kirkuk," the statement added, noting that "The first point of the initiative is to immediately withdraw the security forces from the district and make them deploy outside it and handing the security file to the local police."

    "The second point is to conduct a fair and just investigation over the clashes to reveal the doers of the massacre of Hawija and submitting the investigation results to Kirkuk Court only," the statement concluded.

    http://www.alliraqnews.com/en/index....tical&Itemid=2

  8. #8
    CENTRAL BANK DENIES INTENTION TO RESTRUCTURE THE CURRENCY.....................
    Central Bank denies intention to restructure the currency and delete Asgar at the moment
    Author: Bian5 on: Thursday 25/04/2013 08:21 pm

    News Source: Baghdad 2

    BAGHDAD / WAP / central bank denied his intention to restructure the currency and delete Asgar at the moment.


    A statement by the Central Bank received news agency Baghdad International / WAP / copy of it on Thursday he was "handled some of the media statements about the intention of the Iraqi Central Bank to restructure the Iraqi currency and deleting three zeros from the time confirming the central bank that the only and the reference to a statement from such These things, refers to the absence of his intention to restructure the currency and delete Asgar at the moment. "

    http://translate.google.com/translat...hdadiabian.com

  9. #9
    Iraqi oil exports to Turkey stop
    Thursday, 25 April 2013 21:59 | | |

    Salah-il-Din, Tikrit (AIN) –The oil pumping from Kirkuk province for the Turkish port (Ceyhan) was stopped due to bombing the oil pipeline in Tikrit.

    Security source reported to the correspondent of AIN ''Unidentified gunmen detonated the oil pipeline in Shurqat district of northern Tikrit city, the capital of Salah-il-Din province.''

    "The oil pipeline transports the oil from Kirkuk across Salah-il-Din to the Turkish port (Ceyhan)," the source added, noting that "The oil pumping was stopped due to the bombing.''

    http://www.alliraqnews.com/en/index....nomy&Itemid=41

  10. #10
    Vice chest: Maliki to hit as protests Hawija came after his party's loss in elections

    Baghdad (news) .. MP / Sadrist / Ali al-Tamimi attack Almatsama in Hawija, came after the loss of the party of Prime Minister in the elections, in an attempt to stay in power.

    Tamimi said in a statement received by the Agency (news) a copy of it: that the feet of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki to strike demonstrators in Hawija, came after the loss of his party in local elections.
    And considered it an attempt by al-Maliki to stay in power illegally.

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