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  1. #1

    " The Dinar Daily " ...... Thursday, 28 March 2013

    Anbar welcomes the implementation of the demands of the demonstrators
    28-03-2013 | (Voice of Iraq)

    Baghdad - pumice Farah - Omar Abdel-Latif
    In the wake of the critical decisions made by the Council of Ministers yesterday Tuesday, especially those that relate to the demands of the protesters legitimate, prevailed feelings welcome Anbar province, amid continued their efforts to deport militants arenas sit, at the time preparing the House of Representatives to take over those decisions, during the next two days. Council Anbar stressed that the province received decisions taken by the Council of Ministers on the demands of the demonstrators, with great satisfaction, and that these decisions revealed at the same time, the agendas of State that has permeated the demonstrations, and people who stand behind them. Vice President of the Council Saadoun al-Shaalan, described in a statement the "Center Brief for the Iraqi Media Network, "on Wednesday, these decisions as" a move to lift the lid "on people who refuse to negotiate, who hold foreign agendas. Included Cabinet decisions multiple files, including your pardon and postponed elections for the provinces of Anbar and Nineveh, and the rules of procedure of the Council of Ministers, and confidential informant and other of issues, as well as addition of the Minister of Education Mohammad Tamim and Industry Minister Ahmed Karbouli, to the Committee of Seven mandated to consider the demands of the demonstrators. Ministerial Committee of Seven, confirmed its part they have responded to many requests for the demonstrators, despite administrative complexities in some state institutions, and noted They also considered the requests of victims of terrorism and victims of the former regime.
    In a statement on the sidelines of a meeting European Union ambassadors yesterday, said Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Affairs Hussain al-Shahristani, who heads the Committee, said that "browse ambassadors accredited in Iraq, the functioning of the Committee, and the latest achievements, on legitimate demands." Within , it was announced leader of the coalition of state law Hassan Sinead, in a statement singled out the "Center Brief for the Iraqi Media Network," said yesterday that "the laws approved by the Council of Ministers, will be sent during the next two days to the House of Representatives." added Sinead that "the House of Representatives will interact with all bills sent to him by the Council of Ministers, especially that the government is the actual Aladry need for the legislation of laws, as its executive body. "


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  2. #2
    Khuzai demands Turkey not to interfere in Iraqi internal affairs
    Thursday, 28 March 2013 08:52 | | |

    Baghdad (AIN) –The Vice President, Khudayer al-Khuzayi, called the Turkish Minister of Foreign Affair, Ahmed Davutoglu, to preserve the historical relation between Iraq and Turkey by not interfering the Iraqi internal affairs.

    Khuzayi's Media Office reported in statement received by AIN on Wednesday "The Iraqi Vice President met the Turkish Minister, on the sidelines of the Arab Summit in Doha, and they discussed the mutual relation and several issues of joint interest.''

    "During the meeting Khuzayi discussed the recent developments in the political arena and the future of Iraqi-Turkish relation, stressing, Iraq's desire to open a new page in the mutual relations based on common interests and mutual respect,'' the statement added.

    "Khuzayi assured that Iraq had a history of good relation with Turkey and confrimed the necessity to preserve this relation by not interfering in Iraqi internal affairs,'' the statement pointed out.

    According to the statement "The Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs confirmed the desire of his country to build a strong relation with Iraq, pointing out the important role of Iraq in many Arab and regional cases particularly the Syrian issue.''

    http://www.alliraqnews.com/en/index....tical&Itemid=2

    *** PLEASE RECALL THAT NIRCHIVAN BARZANI RETURNED JUST YESTERDAY FROM MEETINGS IN TURKEY AND STATED FOR THE NEWS THAT ANY OIL DEALS BETWEEN TURKEY AND THE KURDS WOULD BE COMPLIANT WITH THE CONSTITUTION. UNFORTUNATELY BAGHDAD AND THE KURDS HAVE CONFLICTING INTERPRETATIONS OF THE CONSTITUTION, SO, CONSTITUTIONAL FOR ONE MAY UNCONSTITUTIONAL FOR THE OTHER ***

    AND

    READ WITH INTEREST






    Geopolitical Shifts in Mideast
    Will Benefit Kurds

    By: Jihad el-Zein Translated from An-Nahar (Lebanon).

    No matter where the rains fall in our region these days, the bloom is always Kurdish. In the Kurds’ view, be they elites or commoners, this political era is theirs — an era that would see the redressing of 90 years of injustices perpetrated against them since after the First World War. Here, then, is the Kurdish view of the situation in the region on this new-year celebration of Nowruz today.

    Summary :
    Geopolitical developments in the Middle East in the wake of the Arab Spring revolutions will play out in favor of the Kurds, writes Jihad el-Zein.
    Publisher: An-Nahar (Lebanon)
    Original Title:
    Geopolitics are in the Kurds’ Favor: Congratulations and Condolences
    Author: Jihad el-Zein
    First Published: March 21, 2013
    Posted on: March 24 2013
    Translated by: Kamal Fayad

    Categories : Turkey Lebanon


    In the last decade, the first truly independent Kurdish state in modern times was established under the formula of a “federal region” within the Iraqi state. Yet, if it weren’t for the region’s share of the central government’s oil, nothing would remain of this formula, except nominal ties marred by a relation of daily confrontations.

    During the two years since the Syrian revolution erupted, Syrian Kurds in the extreme north and northeastern parts of the country have enjoyed self-rule in their areas, which extend discontinuously over hundreds of kilometers from Afrin to al-Qamishli along the border with Turkey. The term "Western Kurdistan" was even created during the Syrian revolution to describe these regions, which possess historical roots dissimilar to those of Kurdish areas in Northern Iraq. This is because a large portion of their inhabitants came from Turkey and took refuge there after World War I to escape the Kurdish-Turkish clashes that erupted in the first decade following the establishment of Kamal Ataturk’s republic.

    Throughout the revolution, and despite the fact that control over Kurdish areas fell mostly to the Democratic Union Party — which does not agree, and even clashes, with the Free Syrian Army militias, especially the Islamic fundamentalist factions among them — the Syrian revolutionary leadership committees established abroad were always keen to give precedence to Kurdish individuals. This led to the appointment of Abdulbaset Sieda as head of the Syrian National Council and then Ghassan Hitto as head of the interim government for the liberated areas. It is also well known that many disagreements erupted within the opposition’s institutions between Arabs and Kurds concerning the future identity of Syria and its regime.

    But the happiest development, which might turn out to be the most important event for Kurds in the region, is the ongoing transformation in the relationship between the leader of the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK), the imprisoned Abdullah Ocalan, and the ruling Justice and Development Party in Turkey, headed by Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

    Information in the Turkish press confirms that an agreement has been reached between Ocalan and Ankara, following negotiations started by members of the Kurdish bloc in Turkey’s parliament with officials from the country’s intelligence services, concerning a series of unprecedented steps to establish peace between the two sides, especially in southeastern Turkey. The whole of Turkey is now waiting for Ocalan to address his party’s fighters, instructing them to withdraw beyond Turkey’s borders (to the Kandil Mountains in Northern Iraq) on the occasion of the Kurdish Nowruz celebration on March 21, in return for Ankara’s consent to a series of steps that would strengthen the democratic gains achieved by Turkish Kurds on the political and cultural fronts. This would hinge on the condition that the PKK abandons its secessionist agenda.

    This bold step by Erdogan would undoubtedly not have occurred — or hastened — had the situation in Syria not changed two years ago. It is true that Kurdish political and military pressure inside Turkey has a long history. It is also true that Erdogan strives to amend the constitution and instill a presidential system of governance with him as president. However, the situation that has arisen on the Turkish-Syrian border after March 17, 2011, pushed Erdogan, after much hesitation, into going further and implementing bolder steps in his negotiations with Ocalan. For Erdogan, two years ago, had gone so far as to adopt a hardline discourse against the armed Kurdish insurrection, similar to that espoused by extremist Turkish nationals against any form of recognition of a distinctive Kurdish political identity in Turkey.

    The Syrian crisis has revealed, and the Turkish leader has discovered, that Turkey’s border with Syria — from Aleppo’s countryside to al-Qamishli (approximately 500 kilometers long) — is, in large part, Kurdish.

    The practical experience gained on the ground during the last two years, and Erdogan’s orders to Turkish intelligence services to systematically take charge of the border region with Syria and help Syrian opposition forces spread their control over those regions or even “surrender” them to the opposition on the Syrian side, have made the Turkish president realize that his support of the Syrian revolution against the regime has given Turkish Kurds — and the PKK specifically — a source of backing and a demographic, political and military depth that he had not expected.

    This means that Turkey, as it entered into this wide-ranging international and regional operation to curb Iranian influence over Damascus, not only found itself suddenly at loggerheads with the Russians and their decision to back the Syrian regime, but was also surprised by the negative developments taking place on its border. Ankara was worried about the growing possibility that a Western Kurdistan be established, affording the PKK fighters a safe haven at a time when Turkey sought to establish a buffer zone on its northern border with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime. These developments manifested themselves through a dangerous escalation of armed Kurdish attacks inside Turkey, despite the fact that, in theory at least, the guerillas originated in Northern Iraq.

    Through experience, Erdogan understood that preventing his policies toward Syria from mutating into a strategic burden for Turkey — in this, its most worrisome of internal affairs — requires that unprecedented initiatives be undertaken in his negotiations with prisoner Ocalan.

    Turkey still awaits the results of this negotiating experiment between its strong government and the Kurds, which echoes the courageous decision that former French president Charles De Gaulle took to negotiate with the Algerian National Liberation Front after 1958. These negotiations led to very difficult times internally for France, culminating in a series of attempted coups d’état by extremist French colonial officers who were backed by a portion of French society unable to digest the idea of Algerian independence.

    The fundamental difference in the Turkish case is that the reconciliation project completely precludes any secessionist proclivities by the Kurds, despite the fact that it remains unclear what agreements were reached pertaining to the manner by which the Turkish state’s Kurdish areas would be ruled.

    The agreement is still in its infancy, yet its first victims were the female Kurdish leaders in Paris a short while ago. Nationalist Turkish factions, represented in parliament and the (politically impotent) army, are still observing the events unfold, and we still don’t have any indications as to the depth of the agreement. Thus, we cannot anticipate any final reactions to it; except to say that they range from caution (the Republican People’s Party) to rejection among hardline nationalists (the Nationalist Movement Party).

    Turkey’s labor pains just started, but current events seem to indicate that the ensuing birth will be to the Kurds’ liking and will fulfill the nationalist interests that they aspire to.

    As a result, the Kurdish elite finds itself needing to contend with the following issues:

    The Kurds’ critics could claim that Kurdish aspirations can only be fulfilled at the expense of the “disintegration” of other nations, specifically Iraq and Syria. This means that, since their inception in 1920, Kurdish nationalist movements have always been reliant upon the need to dismantle the region’s countries.

    In response, the Kurds could say that it was no accident that their political and economic rise occurred in the era of democratic changes in the Arab world, which means that the oppressive ruling regimes were responsible for Arab repression against them.

    Both views are correct! Congratulations to the Kurds and Iranians on the occasion of Nowruz today, and condolences — on Mother’s Day — to all the grieving mothers of the victims of this upswell in nationalist, democratic, Arab, Kurdish, Turkish and Iranian sentiments.

    The region has long exploited the Kurds. Now, their time has come to return the favor.


    Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/poli...#ixzz2OoW4rBAm


    After 10 Years of Iraqi Conflict,
    Only Kurds Emerge as Winners

    By: Abdel Hamid Zebari for Al-Monitor Iraq Pulse. Posted on March 27.

    The conflict between Iraqi Kurds and the government in Baghdad has persisted over several stages. Throughout the 20th century, the Kurds did not stop asking for their right to self-determination, in terms of an equal identity in Iraq and recognition of their own language, history and culture. The year 2003, however, marked the start of another stage, one that liberated them from the shackles of the century that reached the peak of its harshness during the rule of former President Saddam Hussein.

    Summary :
    The Kurds of Iraq have been one of the few unequivocal winners from the U.S.-led invasion of 2003, with a greater role in politics and a burgeoning economy, writes Abdel Hamid Zebari.
    Original Title:
    The Iraqi War Freed Kurds From the Shackles of an Entire Century
    Author: Abdel Hamid Zebari
    Translated by: Steffi Chakti and Pascale Menassa

    Categories : Iraq Originals


    Evidently, the Iraqi Kurds benefited the most from the fall of the former Iraqi regime that was led by Hussein’s Socialist Arab Baath Party. Hussein used to deal with the Kurds as a function of his interests. He kept them under internal siege for more than 12 years, in addition to the international blockade that was imposed over Iraq as a whole.

    In 1991, the Kurds freed themselves from the grip of Hussein’s regime in a coup known as the Kurdistan Spring 1991. Then, the Iraqi dictator lost in the second Gulf War and the International Coalition Forces declared the three Kurdish cities no-fly zones. Subsequently, Hussein withdrew his governmental administrations, believing that the cities would not be able to govern themselves.

    Throughout his 35-year rule, Hussein’s policies led to large-scale wars. These include the first Gulf War against Iran, which lasted eight years, and the war of occupation of Kuwait in 1991, also known as the second Gulf War. Hussein returned defeated from both wars, and he caused Iraq huge political and economic damage.

    As soon as Hussein withdrew his administrations from Kurdistan’s three cities — Erbil, Sulaymaniyah and Dohuk — the Kurdish parties, especially the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) led by Massoud Barzani, the current president of the Iraqi Kurdistan Region, and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan led by current Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, conducted the first legislative elections in Kurdish history. As a result, they formed their own parliament and local government, and governed their affairs autonomously.

    Despite the internal divisions and disputes among Kurds during the 1990s, especially between the parties of Barzani and Talabani over the presidency of the region, they were able to organize their administrative affairs and manage the region with financial resources obtained from customs revenues.

    Moreover, during the past few years, the Iraqi Kurdistan region has been isolated from the outside world. The international community did not communicate with the region, since the Iraqi government did not recognize Kurdistan; neither did the neighboring countries, the American administration or the British government.

    Therefore, the region’s politicians and citizens, who could not even obtain a passport from the Iraqi government, had to travel by land illegally through neighboring countries. It was rare to see foreign politicians or businessmen in the Kurdistan region, and it remained that way until the Iraqi liberation war started.

    The fall of Hussein’s former regime and the beginning of a new chapter in Iraq’s history constituted a good opportunity for the Kurds. They used it well and achieved a lot of gains. They now consider themselves strong partners in the political process in the country, although they still have some problems with the current government in Baghdad.

    Thanks to the Iraqi liberation war, Talabani has reached the presidency, a Kurdish figure now occupies the post of foreign minister — which is considered one of the political ministries in the country — and the Kurds have obtained guarantees in the Iraqi constitution.

    For seven years, Talabani has been the president of Iraq, while Hoshyar Zebari, a leader in Barzani’s party, has been in charge of the Foreign Ministry for eight years. The Kurds lead other ministries in the Iraqi government too, and their region is autonomous.

    Following the invasion of Iraq, the Kurds have become strong partners in the political process. Erbil has been transformed into a headquarters for meetings and agreements between Iraqi political powers. Moreover, the Kurds have made many agreements.

    The current constitution has granted the Kurds numerous rights, such as the right to teach Kurdish alongside Arabic in educational institutions. They are also allowed to form their own police forces in the Kurdistan region.

    At the economic level, the Kurdistan region has witnessed significant growth and enormous urban development. This was possible because the region has enjoyed stability, unlike other Iraqi cities, which are struggling with brittle security situations and terrorist attacks that have impeded normal life.

    In addition, Kurdish leaders have kept the three Kurdish cities safe from terrorist attacks, which has helped to make the Kurdistan region a political, economic and cultural gateway.

    As disputes regarding the oil sector have surfaced in Baghdad, Kurds have been able to strike many oil agreements with major international companies, such as ExxonMobil, Total, Chevron and others.

    Kurdish officials confirm that oil has long been a curse, given that former Iraqi regimes used it to acquire weapons and quell the Kurds. Post-2003, the situation has drastically changed and oil has become a cornerstone upon which the Kurdistan region establishes its relationship with the federal government. According to statistics from the Ministry of Natural Resources, the Kurdistan government has to date signed 50 oil contracts with international companies.

    The conflict between Baghdad and Erbil over oil contracts that the Iraqi government does not recognize and considers to be null and void is still standing, even though Kurdistan says that the 2005 constitution granted them this right.

    Statistics from the General Directorate for Investment in the Kurdistan Region demonstrate that foreign and local investment from Aug. 1, 2001, until Feb. 3, 2014, amounted to $24.5 billion from a total of 521 projects in the three cities of Erbil, Sulaymaniyah and Dohuk.

    The Kurdistan regional government started to grant permission for investment projects when a 2006 investment law came into force. According to the latest government figures, 2,400 foreign companies are registered in the region’s records.

    The construction campaign has ushered in 8,500 new residential units, in addition to tourist projects (five-star hotels), health projects (hospitals), and a significant number of industrial, agricultural and financial projects.

    On the cultural level, choosing Erbil as the 2014 Arab Tourism Capital was one of the most important events in the last 10 years.

    This initiative came as a result of the urban development that has occurred in the Kurdistan region on all levels, particularly in the tourism sector. Over the past few years, the Iraqi Kurdistan region has witnessed the arrival of millions of tourists from Iraq and neighboring countries, in addition to visitors from Europe and the United States.

    Mahmoud Outhman, a Kurdish MP and former member of the Coalition Provisional Authority, said that “the Kurds have reaped many benefits after the fall of the regime, notably the recognition of their rights and the political agreements they concluded.”

    Abdel Hamid Zebari is a contributing writer for Al-Monitor’s Iraq Pulse. A reporter from Erbil who works in the field of print journalism and radio, he has published several reports in local and world media, including Agence France-Press and Radio Free Iraq (Radio Free Europe).


    Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/orig...#ixzz2OoTElYhy
    Last edited by chattels; 03-28-2013 at 07:37 AM.

  3. #3
    Watering War or Peace in the Middle East


    There appears to be very little coordination and cooperation among countries of the Middle East over sharing or managing water resources that cross international boundaries. The people and countries who share the water have very little information about each other and about what is happening to the water that they share with others across borders.

    We often talk about water as the cause of the next war in the Middle East. That could well be if the countries and people of the region continue as they are doing now: Water usage is not reasonable in most places, and fair use of this precious resource is not in the general culture of the people.

    Last week, I attended a conference in Istanbul titled Blue Peace in the Middle East, aimed at preventing a water war. The event was organized by the Strategic Foresight Group, and gathered more than 100 politicians, experts and journalists to discuss the water crisis in the Middle East and ways of transforming the resource into an opportunity for a new form of peace. In this blue peace, countries with access to adequate, clean and sustainable water resources would not feel motivated to engage in a military conflict with neighbors over control.

    In a report titled Blue Peace, the Strategic Foresight Group calls for a rethinking of water in the Middle East. It presents a roadmap for action, beginning with efficient internal management, storage and distribution. It also calls for: The establishment of a Cooperation Council for Water Resources for Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and Turkey; and a high-level Confidence Building Initiative between Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

    This vision could be achievable if the governments and people of the Middle East provide adequate information to citizens, helping them understand the reality of the water crisis and monitor decisions made by governments.

    To achieve this, the Istanbul meeting proposed the establishment of a media network, that would unite the regional media, water experts and decision makers, helping them inform, educate and prevent conflicts from arising.

    Currently, water is the last item of priorities for the people, media and politicians of these countries. The main reason is the lack of informed interest on the subject. The establishment of cooperation councils and water commissions of these countries would not mean much without a connected media network.

    The media need to create the adequate space and programs to disseminate information, and the politicians need to start making water part of their politics and policies. Among citizens, everyone must start opening spaces for this very important topic, beginning with social media tools.

    Water is the next item on everyone's agenda in the Middle East.

    Today’s actions will determine tomorrow’s war or peace.

    Hiwa Osman is a Media Development specialist based in Erbil.

    http://rudaw.net/english/opinion/27032013

  4. #4
    Will Anbar Elections Go Ahead?
    By: Mustafa al-Kadhimi for Al-Monitor Iraq Pulse. Posted on March 27.

    Some in Baghdad are asking whether the decision to postpone elections in the provinces of Anbar and Nineveh will be reversed, following pressure from both internal and international powers, notably the United Nations and the United States. US Secretary of State John Kerry explicitly expressed his country’s objection to this decision.

    Summary :
    Questions have been raised in Baghdad over the decision to postpone Anbar's provincial elections, and the decision may be reversed, writes Mustafa al-Kadhimi.
    Original Title:
    Will the Anbar Elections Go Ahead?
    Author: Mustafa al-Kadhimi
    Translated by: Steffi Chakti

    Categories :Originals Iraq


    The decision to postpone elections in the two provinces — both of which have seen anti-government protests over the past three months — was explained in a brief statement that stressed two important factors. The first concerned the security situation in Anbar and Mosul, and the second involved the fear that elections would open the door for “terrorists” to assume the seat of power.

    The internal response to these justifications came from the protesters themselves and from some conspicuous Shiite powers, such as the Sadrist movement and Ammar Hakim’s movement. On the international level, responses came from Kerry and from Martin Kobler, the U.N. secretary-general's representative in Iraq. The reply relies on two arguments.

    The first stresses that the security situation in Anbar and Nineveh reached a peak when the Constituent Assembly elections took place in 2005, and when the constitution was passed in a referendum. A similarly disturbing situation didn't hinder provincial elections in 2009, or the parliamentary elections of 2010.

    Moreover, the unprecedented turbulence in Baghdad's security situation is far worse than what has been witnessed in Anbar and Mosul. During the course of one week, 40 car bombs exploded and caused thousands of casualties in Baghdad. Anbar and Mosul didn't see similarly fervent violent acts.

    The second argument addresses the fear of “terrorists” seizing power. The logical question in that concern is: how were these terrorists allowed, in the first place, to present their candidates? Since laws require that candidates present their candidacy to the High Electoral Commission for ratification, does that mean that the government is meddling in the course of elections?

    Neither political elites nor Shiite cleric Ali al-Sistani, who is well known for his unflappable conservative stance, were convinced by the explanations for postponing the elections. Shiite leader Muqtada al-Sadr affirmed that the postponement was carried out for political reasons, not because of security concerns.

    Several days ago, protesters in Anbar formed a committee to negotiate on their behalf. The committee is led by Ahmad Bou Risha, the leader of the Sahwa movement, Ali Hatem, chieftain of the Dulaim tribes, and Ahmad al-Alwani, a member of parliament from the Iraqi List party. This initiative was warmly welcomed by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who considered it to be a positive leap forward.

    Regardless of the results of negotiations with the government, reversing the decision to postpone elections in Anbar and Nineveh will serve as a solid ground on which the foundation of these negotiations can be laid.

    Objections to the postponement decision weren't raised only by Sunni political powers brokering the protests. Prominent religious figure Abdul Malak al-Saadi also issued a statement voicing strong opposition to postponing the elections and saying that the decision oppresses the rights of protesters. The government does not wish to promote and deepen this impression among Sunni citizens.

    Kerry’s last visit to Iraq and his explicit statement regarding postponement, and the fact that Washington isn't convinced with the arguments for postponement, will also encourage Baghdad to reverse the decision. Kerry emphasized that this issue — along with Baghdad’s stance regarding the Syrian crisis and accusations that it has facilitated Iran’s support to the Syrian region through allowing Iranian flights to use Iraqi airspace — will constitute a future problem between Washington and Baghdad.

    The provincial elections are scheduled to be held on April 20, and the decision to postpone may be canceled at the last minute. If Baghdad takes notice of the wide-ranging opposition to postponing elections and cancels this decision, it could serve as a gateway to opening the doors for wider dialogue with Sunni cities and placating their concerns.

    Mustafa al-Kadhimi is an Iraqi writer specializing in defense of democracy.


    Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/orig...#ixzz2OoRHTlTN

    AND


    Anbar elections: governor with the postponement but propaganda, the most heavily .. and rejectionists waiting "last-minute"
    28-03-2013 | (Voice of Iraq)

    Baghdad / Wael grace


    On the impact of the decision the federal government to postpone the elections in Anbar province, swinging voter in determining the choice, while controlled confusion on the candidate to move forward towards continued campaigning on or off, but the city is witnessing demonstrations against the government three months ago is counting on a negotiating process to be led conservative demonstrators with the government could lead to the holding of elections.
    Divided Anbar province "candidates and voters" to more than opinion regarding postponement of the elections in the province, Vvriv of candidates has lowered pictures from the walls and poles and other decided to wait a bit until a decision is final in the elections to maintain, while the other team is still going on in the campaign propaganda, relying on the government's decision to postpone the elections at the last minute.
    The voters in Anbar Some criticized strongly the postponement decision and denied there was any justification for the delay, especially as they say that the security situation "very well in the city," and others feared exploitation in some quarters for election fraud because there demonstrations and polarizations political "for some of the militants."
    While another team stands on the fence and does not see in the next election or the previous government came Anbar current due to the disappointment of the councils which alternated their wallets.
    And consistent people of the province (Opponents and supporters) to conduct local elections on the need to promote local government coming to provide municipal services and building hospitals, schools and end the state of unemployment, the more concerns they risk growing cancers for men and women, where infected a lot of men of the city of lung cancer, while suffering wives of breast cancer, and their children are born deformed.
    The federal government had decided last Tuesday before the postponement of local elections in the provinces of Nineveh and Anbar at the request of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki for a period of six months, against the backdrop of a series of car bombs and improvised explosive devices rocked the provinces of Babil and Kirkuk.
    Although the governor of Anbar province Qasim al-Fahdawi, who heads the list of passing electoral and hopes to maintain his position in the ballot next one of the most supporters of the government's decision to postpone the elections but the image electoral larger among the candidates still standing distance is not far more than five meters on top of each control point inspection in the province.
    The Fahdawi of supporters of the idea of ​​postponing the elections and says in a remarks that "the security situation in Anbar is stable and security forces preoccupied with securing the demonstrations," while in line three blocks other in Anbar with the position of the governor, including Dawa organization inside who is running in the province of four candidates among them one woman.
    In contrast stands 13 block includes 400 candidates against the postponement decision led bloc "united", led by House Speaker Osama Nujaifi alongside Salim al and Ahmed Abu Risha and Minister of Finance resigned Rafie al-Issawi and provincial council chairman Saadoun al-Shaalan, as well as a list glory of Iraq headed by Ali Hatem Salman.
    He holds candidates rejectionists to the decision to postpone the elections, the government responsible for their losses significant financial due to suspension of their campaigns, which estimated that each candidate spent nearly "15" million, also holding the government is also responsible for some were to threats and assassination attempts, stressing that the security situation is very stable There is no justification for the postponement of the elections.
    Expanded entities opposition to postpone the elections to collect signatures for 400 candidates representing 13 block and sent to the Electoral Commission in the city, as they sit in front of the Commission refusing the postponement decision and handed one representatives of the blocks signatures naysayers for the delay to the UNHCR office. "And participate in the upcoming elections 9 coalitions and 7 entities political, and the number of candidates for the province of Anbar 600 candidate, a quarter of them women, are competing to fill the 29 seats in the provincial council.
    The alliance of the Iraqi Awakening and Independents National won 8 seats in the recent local elections, and won combines project Iraqi National (led by Saleh al-Mutlaq) on 6 seats, the Alliance of intellectuals and tribal development (Islamic Party) on 6 seats, either the National Movement for Reform and Development (solution) Vhsalt 3 seats, and the Iraqi List got only two seats.



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  5. #5
    MY ABIDING FEAR REGARDING THE VIABILITY AND SUCCESS OF THE IRAQI BANKING SECTOR REFORM PROJECT AND THE REVALUATION OF THE IRAQI DINAR, WHICH IS THE LIQUIDITY EVENT WE ALL AWAIT, HAS ALWAYS BEEN THE PROSPECTS OF AN INDEPENDENT KURDISTAN AND THE ABANDONMENT OF THE DINAR AS IT'S CURRENCY. I AM NOW LESS CONCERNED GIVEN MY DEVELOPING SENSE OF THE OPERATIVE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC DYNAMICS AT WORK IN THE REGION. CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES AND / OR INFORMATION :

    After 10 Years of Iraqi Conflict,
    Only Kurds Emerge as Winners

    By: Abdel Hamid Zebari for Al-Monitor Iraq Pulse. Posted on March 27.

    The conflict between Iraqi Kurds and the government in Baghdad has persisted over several stages. Throughout the 20th century, the Kurds did not stop asking for their right to self-determination, in terms of an equal identity in Iraq and recognition of their own language, history and culture. The year 2003, however, marked the start of another stage, one that liberated them from the shackles of the century that reached the peak of its harshness during the rule of former President Saddam Hussein.

    Summary :
    The Kurds of Iraq have been one of the few unequivocal winners from the U.S.-led invasion of 2003, with a greater role in politics and a burgeoning economy, writes Abdel Hamid Zebari.
    Original Title:
    The Iraqi War Freed Kurds From the Shackles of an Entire Century
    Author: Abdel Hamid Zebari
    Translated by: Steffi Chakti and Pascale Menassa

    Categories : Iraq Originals


    Evidently, the Iraqi Kurds benefited the most from the fall of the former Iraqi regime that was led by Hussein’s Socialist Arab Baath Party. Hussein used to deal with the Kurds as a function of his interests. He kept them under internal siege for more than 12 years, in addition to the international blockade that was imposed over Iraq as a whole.

    In 1991, the Kurds freed themselves from the grip of Hussein’s regime in a coup known as the Kurdistan Spring 1991. Then, the Iraqi dictator lost in the second Gulf War and the International Coalition Forces declared the three Kurdish cities no-fly zones. Subsequently, Hussein withdrew his governmental administrations, believing that the cities would not be able to govern themselves.

    Throughout his 35-year rule, Hussein’s policies led to large-scale wars. These include the first Gulf War against Iran, which lasted eight years, and the war of occupation of Kuwait in 1991, also known as the second Gulf War. Hussein returned defeated from both wars, and he caused Iraq huge political and economic damage.

    As soon as Hussein withdrew his administrations from Kurdistan’s three cities — Erbil, Sulaymaniyah and Dohuk — the Kurdish parties, especially the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) led by Massoud Barzani, the current president of the Iraqi Kurdistan Region, and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan led by current Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, conducted the first legislative elections in Kurdish history. As a result, they formed their own parliament and local government, and governed their affairs autonomously.

    Despite the internal divisions and disputes among Kurds during the 1990s, especially between the parties of Barzani and Talabani over the presidency of the region, they were able to organize their administrative affairs and manage the region with financial resources obtained from customs revenues.

    Moreover, during the past few years, the Iraqi Kurdistan region has been isolated from the outside world. The international community did not communicate with the region, since the Iraqi government did not recognize Kurdistan; neither did the neighboring countries, the American administration or the British government.

    Therefore, the region’s politicians and citizens, who could not even obtain a passport from the Iraqi government, had to travel by land illegally through neighboring countries. It was rare to see foreign politicians or businessmen in the Kurdistan region, and it remained that way until the Iraqi liberation war started.

    The fall of Hussein’s former regime and the beginning of a new chapter in Iraq’s history constituted a good opportunity for the Kurds. They used it well and achieved a lot of gains. They now consider themselves strong partners in the political process in the country, although they still have some problems with the current government in Baghdad.

    Thanks to the Iraqi liberation war, Talabani has reached the presidency, a Kurdish figure now occupies the post of foreign minister — which is considered one of the political ministries in the country — and the Kurds have obtained guarantees in the Iraqi constitution.

    For seven years, Talabani has been the president of Iraq, while Hoshyar Zebari, a leader in Barzani’s party, has been in charge of the Foreign Ministry for eight years. The Kurds lead other ministries in the Iraqi government too, and their region is autonomous.

    Following the invasion of Iraq, the Kurds have become strong partners in the political process. Erbil has been transformed into a headquarters for meetings and agreements between Iraqi political powers. Moreover, the Kurds have made many agreements.

    The current constitution has granted the Kurds numerous rights, such as the right to teach Kurdish alongside Arabic in educational institutions. They are also allowed to form their own police forces in the Kurdistan region.

    At the economic level, the Kurdistan region has witnessed significant growth and enormous urban development. This was possible because the region has enjoyed stability, unlike other Iraqi cities, which are struggling with brittle security situations and terrorist attacks that have impeded normal life.

    In addition, Kurdish leaders have kept the three Kurdish cities safe from terrorist attacks, which has helped to make the Kurdistan region a political, economic and cultural gateway.

    As disputes regarding the oil sector have surfaced in Baghdad, Kurds have been able to strike many oil agreements with major international companies, such as ExxonMobil, Total, Chevron and others.

    Kurdish officials confirm that oil has long been a curse, given that former Iraqi regimes used it to acquire weapons and quell the Kurds. Post-2003, the situation has drastically changed and oil has become a cornerstone upon which the Kurdistan region establishes its relationship with the federal government. According to statistics from the Ministry of Natural Resources, the Kurdistan government has to date signed 50 oil contracts with international companies.

    The conflict between Baghdad and Erbil over oil contracts that the Iraqi government does not recognize and considers to be null and void is still standing, even though Kurdistan says that the 2005 constitution granted them this right.

    Statistics from the General Directorate for Investment in the Kurdistan Region demonstrate that foreign and local investment from Aug. 1, 2001, until Feb. 3, 2014, amounted to $24.5 billion from a total of 521 projects in the three cities of Erbil, Sulaymaniyah and Dohuk.

    The Kurdistan regional government started to grant permission for investment projects when a 2006 investment law came into force. According to the latest government figures, 2,400 foreign companies are registered in the region’s records.

    The construction campaign has ushered in 8,500 new residential units, in addition to tourist projects (five-star hotels), health projects (hospitals), and a significant number of industrial, agricultural and financial projects.

    On the cultural level, choosing Erbil as the 2014 Arab Tourism Capital was one of the most important events in the last 10 years.

    This initiative came as a result of the urban development that has occurred in the Kurdistan region on all levels, particularly in the tourism sector. Over the past few years, the Iraqi Kurdistan region has witnessed the arrival of millions of tourists from Iraq and neighboring countries, in addition to visitors from Europe and the United States.

    Mahmoud Outhman, a Kurdish MP and former member of the Coalition Provisional Authority, said that “the Kurds have reaped many benefits after the fall of the regime, notably the recognition of their rights and the political agreements they concluded.”

    Abdel Hamid Zebari is a contributing writer for Al-Monitor’s Iraq Pulse. A reporter from Erbil who works in the field of print journalism and radio, he has published several reports in local and world media, including Agence France-Press and Radio Free Iraq (Radio Free Europe).


    Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/orig...#ixzz2OoTElYhy



    AND



    Geopolitical Shifts in Mideast
    Will Benefit Kurds

    By: Jihad el-Zein Translated from An-Nahar (Lebanon).

    No matter where the rains fall in our region these days, the bloom is always Kurdish. In the Kurds’ view, be they elites or commoners, this political era is theirs — an era that would see the redressing of 90 years of injustices perpetrated against them since after the First World War. Here, then, is the Kurdish view of the situation in the region on this new-year celebration of Nowruz today.

    Summary :
    Geopolitical developments in the Middle East in the wake of the Arab Spring revolutions will play out in favor of the Kurds, writes Jihad el-Zein.
    Publisher: An-Nahar (Lebanon)
    Original Title:
    Geopolitics are in the Kurds’ Favor: Congratulations and Condolences
    Author: Jihad el-Zein
    First Published: March 21, 2013
    Posted on: March 24 2013
    Translated by: Kamal Fayad

    Categories : Turkey Lebanon


    In the last decade, the first truly independent Kurdish state in modern times was established under the formula of a “federal region” within the Iraqi state. Yet, if it weren’t for the region’s share of the central government’s oil, nothing would remain of this formula, except nominal ties marred by a relation of daily confrontations.

    During the two years since the Syrian revolution erupted, Syrian Kurds in the extreme north and northeastern parts of the country have enjoyed self-rule in their areas, which extend discontinuously over hundreds of kilometers from Afrin to al-Qamishli along the border with Turkey. The term "Western Kurdistan" was even created during the Syrian revolution to describe these regions, which possess historical roots dissimilar to those of Kurdish areas in Northern Iraq. This is because a large portion of their inhabitants came from Turkey and took refuge there after World War I to escape the Kurdish-Turkish clashes that erupted in the first decade following the establishment of Kamal Ataturk’s republic.

    Throughout the revolution, and despite the fact that control over Kurdish areas fell mostly to the Democratic Union Party — which does not agree, and even clashes, with the Free Syrian Army militias, especially the Islamic fundamentalist factions among them — the Syrian revolutionary leadership committees established abroad were always keen to give precedence to Kurdish individuals. This led to the appointment of Abdulbaset Sieda as head of the Syrian National Council and then Ghassan Hitto as head of the interim government for the liberated areas. It is also well known that many disagreements erupted within the opposition’s institutions between Arabs and Kurds concerning the future identity of Syria and its regime.

    But the happiest development, which might turn out to be the most important event for Kurds in the region, is the ongoing transformation in the relationship between the leader of the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK), the imprisoned Abdullah Ocalan, and the ruling Justice and Development Party in Turkey, headed by Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

    Information in the Turkish press confirms that an agreement has been reached between Ocalan and Ankara, following negotiations started by members of the Kurdish bloc in Turkey’s parliament with officials from the country’s intelligence services, concerning a series of unprecedented steps to establish peace between the two sides, especially in southeastern Turkey. The whole of Turkey is now waiting for Ocalan to address his party’s fighters, instructing them to withdraw beyond Turkey’s borders (to the Kandil Mountains in Northern Iraq) on the occasion of the Kurdish Nowruz celebration on March 21, in return for Ankara’s consent to a series of steps that would strengthen the democratic gains achieved by Turkish Kurds on the political and cultural fronts. This would hinge on the condition that the PKK abandons its secessionist agenda.

    This bold step by Erdogan would undoubtedly not have occurred — or hastened — had the situation in Syria not changed two years ago. It is true that Kurdish political and military pressure inside Turkey has a long history. It is also true that Erdogan strives to amend the constitution and instill a presidential system of governance with him as president. However, the situation that has arisen on the Turkish-Syrian border after March 17, 2011, pushed Erdogan, after much hesitation, into going further and implementing bolder steps in his negotiations with Ocalan. For Erdogan, two years ago, had gone so far as to adopt a hardline discourse against the armed Kurdish insurrection, similar to that espoused by extremist Turkish nationals against any form of recognition of a distinctive Kurdish political identity in Turkey.

    The Syrian crisis has revealed, and the Turkish leader has discovered, that Turkey’s border with Syria — from Aleppo’s countryside to al-Qamishli (approximately 500 kilometers long) — is, in large part, Kurdish.

    The practical experience gained on the ground during the last two years, and Erdogan’s orders to Turkish intelligence services to systematically take charge of the border region with Syria and help Syrian opposition forces spread their control over those regions or even “surrender” them to the opposition on the Syrian side, have made the Turkish president realize that his support of the Syrian revolution against the regime has given Turkish Kurds — and the PKK specifically — a source of backing and a demographic, political and military depth that he had not expected.

    This means that Turkey, as it entered into this wide-ranging international and regional operation to curb Iranian influence over Damascus, not only found itself suddenly at loggerheads with the Russians and their decision to back the Syrian regime, but was also surprised by the negative developments taking place on its border. Ankara was worried about the growing possibility that a Western Kurdistan be established, affording the PKK fighters a safe haven at a time when Turkey sought to establish a buffer zone on its northern border with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime. These developments manifested themselves through a dangerous escalation of armed Kurdish attacks inside Turkey, despite the fact that, in theory at least, the guerillas originated in Northern Iraq.

    Through experience, Erdogan understood that preventing his policies toward Syria from mutating into a strategic burden for Turkey — in this, its most worrisome of internal affairs — requires that unprecedented initiatives be undertaken in his negotiations with prisoner Ocalan.

    Turkey still awaits the results of this negotiating experiment between its strong government and the Kurds, which echoes the courageous decision that former French president Charles De Gaulle took to negotiate with the Algerian National Liberation Front after 1958. These negotiations led to very difficult times internally for France, culminating in a series of attempted coups d’état by extremist French colonial officers who were backed by a portion of French society unable to digest the idea of Algerian independence.

    The fundamental difference in the Turkish case is that the reconciliation project completely precludes any secessionist proclivities by the Kurds, despite the fact that it remains unclear what agreements were reached pertaining to the manner by which the Turkish state’s Kurdish areas would be ruled.

    The agreement is still in its infancy, yet its first victims were the female Kurdish leaders in Paris a short while ago. Nationalist Turkish factions, represented in parliament and the (politically impotent) army, are still observing the events unfold, and we still don’t have any indications as to the depth of the agreement. Thus, we cannot anticipate any final reactions to it; except to say that they range from caution (the Republican People’s Party) to rejection among hardline nationalists (the Nationalist Movement Party).

    Turkey’s labor pains just started, but current events seem to indicate that the ensuing birth will be to the Kurds’ liking and will fulfill the nationalist interests that they aspire to.

    As a result, the Kurdish elite finds itself needing to contend with the following issues:

    The Kurds’ critics could claim that Kurdish aspirations can only be fulfilled at the expense of the “disintegration” of other nations, specifically Iraq and Syria. This means that, since their inception in 1920, Kurdish nationalist movements have always been reliant upon the need to dismantle the region’s countries.

    In response, the Kurds could say that it was no accident that their political and economic rise occurred in the era of democratic changes in the Arab world, which means that the oppressive ruling regimes were responsible for Arab repression against them.

    Both views are correct! Congratulations to the Kurds and Iranians on the occasion of Nowruz today, and condolences — on Mother’s Day — to all the grieving mothers of the victims of this upswell in nationalist, democratic, Arab, Kurdish, Turkish and Iranian sentiments.

    The region has long exploited the Kurds. Now, their time has come to return the favor.


    Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/poli...#ixzz2OoW4rBAm



    AND


    THE FOLLOWING WAS POSTED YESTERDAY IN BGG'S BLOG :


    Chattels comment – *** I HAVE BELIEVED FOR SOMETIME NOW THAT IF THERE IS A SINGULAR MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE FOR THE KURDS, IT IS THE RESOLUTION OF THE DISPUTED AREAS UNDER THE ERBIL AGREEMENT ( A PROCESS FOR SELF DETERMINATION ) AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ARTICLE 140 UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. THE KURDS INTEND TO HAVE TRADITIONAL AND HISTORICAL KURDISH AREAS RESTORED TO THE KURDISH REGION AND THE DISPLACEMENT POLICIES OF THE FORMER REGIME UNDONE. IT IS THE CORNERSTONE IN THE FOUNDATION OF THE KURDISH NATIONALIST VISION. NATION BUILDING BEGINS WITH THE DEFINING OF IT’S BORDERS AS THE PLACE FOR THE RETURN OF OF IT’S PEOPLE FROM THE DIASPORA. WE NEED LOOK NO FURTHER THAN THE MODEL OF THE ZIONIST STATE FOR A ROADMAP FOR NATIONALISM IN KURDISTAN, IMO ***



    MY BELIEF IS THAT THE KURDS WILL REMAIN A PART OF IRAQ FOR THE NEAR / FORSEEABLE TERM BECAUSE UNDER THE CONSTITUTION OF IRAQ AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ARTICLE 140 AND THE ERBIL AGREEMENT IS THEIR BEST OPPORTUNITY TO HAVE ERBIL AND MOSUL RESTORED TO THEIR REGION WITHOUT ARMED CONFLICT. THE NATIONALIST VISION OF A GREATER KURDISTAN IS BEST SERVED BY A PASSIVE - AGGRESSIVE APPROACH WORKING WITHIN THE CURRENT POLITICAL FRAMEWORK. THE FRUITS OF THE GEOPOLITICAL SHIFTS OCCURING IN THE REGION, SYRIA AND A NEW RELATIONSHIP WITH TURKEY ARGUABLY WILL BELONG TO THE KURDS. ADD TO THE FOREGOING THE POSSIBILITIES OF A WAR WITH IRAN BY OTHERS ( USA / ISRAEL AND A COALITION ) AND THE HORIZON FOR THE DREAM OF NATIONALISM AND A GREATER KURDISTAN LOOKS VERY BRIGHT INDEED AND ALL OF IT MAY BE ACCOMPLISHED THROUGH MINIMAL DIRECT ACTION BY THE KURDS.

  6. #6
    MP reveals emergency session of Cabinet on the amnesty and accountability and justice.
    28/03/2013 09:19:00

    BAGHDAD / NINA / MP, of the Iraqiya coalition, Raad Dahlaki revealed an emergency session of the Council of Ministers in the next few days to agree the general amnesty and accountability and justice laws to send to parliament for approval.

    He told the National Iraqi News Agency / NINA / "The government began obviously responding to the legal and constitutional demands of the demonstrators, especially the amnesty and accountability and justice laws, which will be resolved in the next few days."

    He added: "the cabinet will throw ball in the Parliament's stadium that has to prove that the people's representatives are able to pass laws that serve people especially the legitimate demands of demonstrators."

    Concerning the accusation of Iraqiya to Deputy Prime Minister, Saleh al-Mutlaq that he violated the agreement not to attend the meetings of the Council of Ministers, he explained "The Iraqiya had commissioned Dr. Mutlaq to manage the negotiations within the Committee of Five to discuss the demands of the demonstrators, adding attending ministers of Iraqiya was to complete their path and achieve something to the demonstrators, stressing that we have achieved something. "

    The Cabinet had held its session on Tuesday to discuss the legitimate and constitutional demands of the demonstrators in the presence of Deputy Prime Minister, of the Iraqiya, Saleh al-Mutlaq and the Education Minister, Mohammad Tamim and Industry and Minerals Minister, Ahmed Karbouli.

    http://www.ninanews.com/english/News...ar95_VQ=GGMGHD

  7. #7
    The return of boycotters represents a turning point in the political process.
    28/03/2013 09:19:00

    BAGHDAD / NINA / MP, of the state of law coalition, Ali al-Fayyad said that the return of the boycotters' ministers to the Cabinet has actively contributed to achieve most of the legitimate demands of the demonstrators, which embodied in the decisions issued by the Presidency of the Council of Ministers on last Tuesday.

    He added in a statement that "The return of the boycotters to the meetings of the Council of Ministers is considered as a significant turning point in the political process and a reassuring message to the citizen.


    He called on everyone to leave sectarian and tense statements and work to build the country and achieve the goals of its people, considering the decisions issued by the Cabinet concerning the demands of the protesters, especially the law of amnesty and accountability and justice and so on, have achieved by the efforts of the national figures and ministers who have returned to their work. "

    It is mentioned that Deputy Prime Minister for Services Affairs Saleh al-Mutlaq and the industry minister Jamal al-Karbouli and education minister Mohammad Tamim resumed attending meetings of the Council of Ministers on Tuesday, as well as Electricity Minister Abdul Karim Aftan, who had preceded them ".

    The ministers of Iraqiya coalition had boycotted cabinet meetings on 8 January in protest against the non-implementation of the government to the demands of the demonstrators, while the Kurds ministers were summoned to Irbil to consult with their leadership after approving the budget, which they objected.

    http://www.ninanews.com/english/News...ar95_VQ=GGMGFK

    BUT

    Current problems greater than Parliament’s ability to solve them, says MP
    Thursday, 28 March 2013 09:20 | | |

    Baghdad (AIN) –MP, Haval Questani, of Taghyeer Kurdish bloc pointed out “The current problems are greater than the parliament’s ability to solve them.”

    He stated to AIN “Resuming holding the parliament sessions will help in reducing the tensions among the blocs but this will not result in reaching full solutions for the crisis.”

    “MPs’ attendance for the parliament session is positively reflected on the political scene because the parliament is a place to settle disputes rather than creating them,” he added.

    “The crises that are created outside the parliament are brought inside the parliament through the representatives of the parties and the blocs,” he concluded.

    http://www.alliraqnews.com/en/index....tical&Itemid=2

  8. #8
    Parliament decides to cut million from the salaries of its members absent at today's meeting and future meetings

    House of Representatives decided million pieces of absentee salaries of members of the council.

    A source familiar with the "House Speaker Osama Nujaifi said Thursday about cutting million dinars instead of half a million absentee from the salaries of members of the council."

    "The House also decided that the hearings will be continuing over the next week and holidays free."

    The House of Representatives announced for publishing the names of absentees from its members for a session on Thursday on the official site of the Council


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    http://www.burathanews.com/news_article_189131.html

  9. #9
    Postpone the hearing of the House of Representatives to next Sunday to a lack of quorum and publish the names of absentees for today's session on the website


    Announced the Presidency of the Council of Representatives to postpone the hearing that was scheduled for today, to next Sunday to a lack of quorum.

    ". A parliamentary source said that "the Iraqi Council of Representatives decided to postpone its meeting today to next Sunday for lack of quorum."

    كHe also announced the House of Representatives from publishing the names of absentees from its members for a session on Thursday on the official site of the Council.

    A source familiar with the Euphrates News Agency {}, "Chairman of the House of Representatives decided to publish the names of absentees from the House of Representatives hearing on Thursday on the official website of the Council", accusing some of them to "disable meeting."

    وHe added that "{180} deputy and deputy of {325} were present in the parliament building today," adding that "{118} Deputy Vice only are entered into the parliamentary hall


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    http://www.burathanews.com/news_article_189130.html

  10. #10
    Kurdish lawmaker: will not attend parliament sessions only after the approval of the presidency of the region

    MP for the Kurdistan Alliance Bakr weft friend deputies bloc would not attend sessions of the House of Representatives, even if on the interrogation of al-Maliki only after the approval of the presidency of the region.


    A friend said, "Our decision last about withdrawal from the Council of Representatives was a collective decision and centrally and we await a decision presidency of the Kurdistan region to come to the sessions and then implement," stressing that "we will not return to parliament sessions even if these sessions exceptional though about questioning President Minister Nuri al-Maliki longer the decision of the presidency. "


    The head of the Kurdistan region, Massoud Barzani, has called in a statement Kurdish deputies in the federal parliament to return to the region with options remain open.


    The call came after the House vote federal budget, the federal public for the current year by a majority without the participation of the Kurds against the backdrop of requiring them to pay the federal government dues of the oil companies operating in Kurdistan


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    http://www.burathanews.com/news_article_189125.html

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